Person-centred dementia care knowledge and practice – level 2


Introduction

This course enables frontline care staff to become accredited dementia care practitioners with the knowledge, insight and skills to effectively meet the needs of people with dementia.

Increasingly, CQC inspectors are looking for outcomes of training that has been undertaken (not just the numbers of staff who have attended) and this nationally recognised certificate provides externally validated evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes.

The course is accredited by OCN London. The programme comprises 4 training days, ongoing support and assessment, and a final 1-1 meeting to enable candidates to achieve 12 credits at level 2 (complying with the national credit based learning unit guidelines and level equivalence). The course addresses the Skills for Care ‘Common Care Principles for Supporting People with Dementia’ and is mapped to the QCF dementia units.
The training is interactive and stimulating as well as informative, and enables participants to develop person-centred attitudes and approaches to their work with people with dementia.

Assessment is carried out using a variety of techniques, requiring only minimal written work; the course is suitable for any candidate with basic skills in written and spoken English.


Course content

The experience of living with dementia
Recognising and addressing feelings
Facts about dementia
Delirium and depression
Medical and social models of dementia
Compensating for difficulties and drawing on strengths
Working in partnership – supporting independence
Assumptions, myths and stigma
Developing knowledge of individuals
The environment and dementia
Addressing psychological needs

 

Overcoming communication barriers
Supporting verbal and non-verbal communication
Responding to different realities
Empathy and validation
Behaviour that challenges
Preventing and responding to aggression
Assessing and managing risk
Supporting relatives and other carers
Activities and occupation
Life story work
Well-being in dementia